8 thoughts on “FCC Rules on MediaCon

  1. We should start asking what the public gets in exchange for giving the networks part of the spectrum. Former FCC Chairman William Kennard looked into this in 1998 and had some very intersting thoughts. See, e.g., http://www.fcc.gov/Speeches/Kennard/Statements/stwek809.html. Essentially what Kennard wanted to do was to supplement campaign finance reform efforts with a way of reducing the cost of campaigns for clean money candidates through the quid pro quo of giving networks part of the spectrum.

  2. If you only have time to dip into some of the FCC documents on this ruling, read the press release version and then read Commissioner Copps’ articulate and devastating dissent:
    http://www.fcc.gov/Daily_Releases/Daily_Business/2003/db0602/DOC-235047A9.pdf

    It’s remarkable how far the public interest mission of the FCC (which is so explicit in its statutory obligations and still shapes the rhetoric even of its pro-industry rulings) has strayed from its original intent and promise.

    Copps points out that the silver lining may be that the extremity of this ruling has awakened the sleeping giant of the American public, who overwhelmingly oppose consolidation across the board….

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