Electoral-Vote seeks backup

The quite wonderful, fully addictive Electoral-Vote.com
is seeking further backups, and thinking through their RSS strategy as
well.  Seems they’ve been victims of attacks (why?).  Read to
the bottom of the page:

“Finally, there was another attack Friday, but we seem to have done
better this time. As a precaution against future attacks, I have
installed a fourth server. If you can’t get through to
http://www.electoral-vote.com, try http://www.electoral-vote2.com,
http://www.electoral-vote3.com, and http://www.electoral-vote4.com in that order. The
main one is far more powerful than the others and has multiple
fiber-optic connections to the Internet. It is also updated first, so
please use only http://www.electoral-vote.com unless it is not working.
Another alternative in case of an attack is the RSS feed, which is much
harder to attack.

I would be interested in getting a one or two more backups for
emergency use in case of future attacks. I have had some volunteers,
but it is hard to tell if they are friend or foe. That kind offer from
sneaky-joe@unknown-company.com might be from one of the attackers, who
wants to run a server with doctored data. I thought of a simple filter
that will probably reduce this problem to a minimum. The server should
be in the .edu domain (NOT .com or .net) and the contact person should
be a tenured professor. Senior faculty members tend to have a long
paper trail and would be risking their careers by attacking a political
website or monkeying with the data. Since there is hardly any time
left, I basically want a clone of the current servers to make sure
everything works the first time. The required configuration is a
Pentium 4 or Pentium III with 512 MB RAM or more, at least 1 GB of
available disk space, and a connection to the Internet capable of
serving 500,000 small files an hour. The software should be UNIX, BSD,
or Linux (NOT Windows or Mac OS X) running Apache and a couple of other
things I will tell potential sites privately. Also needed is an
experienced system administrator who has earned his spurs dealing with
large-scale attacks. BEFORE making an offer, please check with your
local system administrator about the configuration, capacity, and
hackproofness.”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s